DLI - Czech Language Course - Artillary Troops

We made using the DLI - Czech Language Course - Artillary Troops material easier to use and more effective. You can now read the ebook (in the pane on the left), listen to the audio (pane to the right) and practice your pronunciation (use on the Pronunciation Tool tab on right) all at the same time.

The DLI - Czech Language Course - Artillary Troops material can be used both as a self-guided course or with the assistance of a qualified Czech tutor.

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Audios

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 01 Side 1

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 01 Side 2

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 02 Side 1

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 02 Side 2

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 03 Side 1

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 03 Side 2

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 04 Side 1

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 04 Side 2

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 05 Side 1

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 05 Side 2

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 06 Side 1

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 06 Side 2

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 07 Side 1

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 07 Side 2

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 08 Side 1

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 08 Side 2

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 09 Side 1

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 09 Side 2

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 10 Side 1

Czech Artillery Course -Tape 10 Side 2


Defense Language Institute Czech  - Image There are 10 lessons in the Czech Artillery Course. Each of the lessons is based on a narrative and a segment of a simulated interrogation of a fictitious Czech artillery troops officer captured by U.S. forces in a fictitious armed conflict in Europe.

This fictitious officer, Lieutenant Vlach, is a dissident in deep conflict with the political situation in Czechoslovakia. He also disagrees with the Soviet Union's domineering policies dictating the stand Czechoslovakia is to take in economic, political, and military matters. Lieutenant Vlach has been characterized like this solely to maintain an ongoing dialog for the purpose of lang-uage instruction, and is, therefore, totally cooperative.

It should also be noted that the information on Czech military organization, logistics, tactics, weapons, and equipment is provided in these lessons only for the purpose of language instruction. The primary goal of this course is to advance language skills necessary for conducting interrogations in the Czech language for the purpose of obtaining information of tactical value in military operations.

Modules, consisting of one or more lessons, provide the essential division of topics presented in the Czech Artillery Course. Modules are independent units of instruction which allow the student to choose the order in which he wants to study these topics. When a topic requires more than one lesson for adequate treatment, two or more lessons form a module. For instance, Lesson TT-1 and TT-2 form the TT-Module.

Module lessons are designated by letter codes indicating phases of interrogations. The codes are listed on page four. All module lesson designations are shown on the course map on page five of this manual.

Each lesson of the Czech Artillery Course consists of a printed booklet and two audio recordings. The booklet is printed in English and in Czech. The recordings are narrated in English with Czech portions recorded by native speakers. Printed and recorded materials are designed to be used together.

Czech, formerly known as Bohemian, is a West Slavic language spoken by over 10 million people. It is the official language in the Czech Republic (where most of its speakers live), and has minority language status in Slovakia. Czech's closest relative is Slovak, with which it is mutually intelligible. It is closely related to other West Slavic languages, such as Silesian and Polish, and more distantly to East Slavic languages such as Russian. Although most Czech vocabulary is based on shared roots with Slavic and other Indo-European languages, many loanwords (most associated with high culture) have been adopted in recent years.

Czech is spoken in: Czech Republic

Czech is also called: Bohemian

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