DLI - Czech Language Course - Proficiency Improvement

We made using the DLI - Czech Language Course - Proficiency Improvement material easier to use and more effective. You can now read the ebook (in the pane on the left), listen to the audio (pane to the right) and practice your pronunciation (use on the Pronunciation Tool tab on right) all at the same time.

The DLI - Czech Language Course - Proficiency Improvement material can be used both as a self-guided course or with the assistance of a qualified Czech tutor.

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Audios

Czech Proficiency Course - Tape 01 Workbook 01

Czech Proficiency Course - Tape 02 Workbook 02-03

Czech Proficiency Course - Tape 03 Workbook 04

Czech Proficiency Course - Tape 04 Workbook 05

Czech Proficiency Course - Tape 05 Workbook 06

Czech Proficiency Course - Tape 06 Workbook 07

Czech Proficiency Course - Tape 07 Workbook 08

Czech Proficiency Course - Tape 08 Workbook 09

Czech Proficiency Course - Tape 09 Workbook 10


Defense Language Institute Czech  - Image This Czech language course was developed by the Defense Language Institute, Foreign Language Center (DLI). The responsibilities of DLI extend beyond resident training; they include technical control of all foreign language training worldwide by the Department of Defense (DoD). As part of this non-resident responsibility, DLI provides courses that allow DLI graduates to maintain and enhance their language skills in the field. This course was designed to fulfill that responsibility. This course is intended for all DoD military and civilian linguists, regardless of occupational specialty. It can be used in a variety of options, from self-study to teacher-based programs similar to those at DLI. It will enable linguists to maintain or increase their proficiency in the target language through a variety of course enrollment options.

The entry requirement for all options is limited to a proficiency level of 1 or 1+. Although each option contains material up to a proficiency level of 2+, successful users could expect, at best, a half-point proficiency gain after course completion. Proficiency levels are determined based on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) Language Skill Level Descriptions as measured by the Defense Language Proficiency Test (DLPT).

The course is composed of 10 workbooks. Each addresses a specific language proficiency level—progressing from the least difficult (1) to the most difficult (2+). Consequently, the workbooks should be taken in numerical sequence. Each workbook is composed of five units. Each unit will require about two hours to complete; therefore, about 10 hours are required to complete a single workbook, or 100 hours to complete all the workbooks. The speaking exercise suggestions require approximately 100 hours of instruction. Each workbook contains a Workbook Test. These tests are to be taken after you have completed all of the exercises in a workbook. All tests are multiple choice and involve no more than 50 items. Instructions for taking the workbook tests are presented before each test. PIC contains several features that distinguish it from other courses. It is based on authentic materials, only military vocabulary is defined for the student, and grammar explanations are kept to a minimum.

Czech, formerly known as Bohemian, is a West Slavic language spoken by over 10 million people. It is the official language in the Czech Republic (where most of its speakers live), and has minority language status in Slovakia. Czech's closest relative is Slovak, with which it is mutually intelligible. It is closely related to other West Slavic languages, such as Silesian and Polish, and more distantly to East Slavic languages such as Russian. Although most Czech vocabulary is based on shared roots with Slavic and other Indo-European languages, many loanwords (most associated with high culture) have been adopted in recent years.

Czech is spoken in: Czech Republic

Czech is also called: Bohemian

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