FSI - French - Metropolitan French FAST Course

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The FSI - French - Metropolitan French FAST Course material can be used both as a self-guided course or with the assistance of a qualified French tutor.

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Audios

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 01

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 02

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 03

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 04

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 05

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 06

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 07

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 08

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 09

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 10

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 11

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 12

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 13

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 14

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 15

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 16

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 17

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 18

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 19

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 20

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 21

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 22

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 23

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 24

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 25

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 26

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 27

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 28

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 29

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 30

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 31

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 32

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 33

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 34

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 35

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 36

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 37

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 38

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 39

Metropolitan French FAST - Lesson 40


Foreign Service Institute French  - Image Is a FSI Metropolitan French Familiarization Short Term (FAST) course just another language course? We don't think so. FAST courses have been welcomed by teachers and students alike for characteristics which are designed to meet specific kinds of language use needs.

This course is not designed for self-instruction. A resourceful and imaginative instructor will be a big help in rapid and successful mastery of the material presented. FAST courses are for those individuals for whom approximately 300 hours of active well-targeted French instruction can mean a more successful living and working experience in the host country. FAST courses help such individuals increase their ability to handle new situations.

A FAST course therefore differs from most traditional courses in its goals, in some features of its format, and in several techniques.

GOALS

Let's begin by being very clear about goals. The students' overall goal, stated generally, is not "to know about the culture," or "to speak the language." It is to acquire the ability to apply the limited amount of language at his or her disposal to the situations students are likely to encounter overseas--and to do so with confidence. Knowledge and skills will be valuable only insofar as they make people more effective in getting things done. A lot of time spent with academic facts or linguistic correctness is incidental to the students' real needs, and can be undesirable.

Specifically, we have concentrated on certain situations with which almost everyone needs to cope: getting into a hotel, using the telephone, dealing with local transportation, and so on. You will spend more of your time than in traditional programs in helping your students with practice for these situations, and less of your time in teaching them forms or patterns to be applied in a broader context. Everything in the lessons that you teach from the materials either should be a simulation of a common activity in the host country, or should contribute directly to such a simulation. This is the principle of "learning by doing" which, in FAST courses, largely overrides the academic practice of "learning by studying about."

Since the goal of the FSI Metropolitan French FAST course is to help students get things done in certain selected everyday situations, your expectations about student performance--the criteria for their success--will have to be different from what we have heretofore assumed them to be.

Thus, you will be satisfied when understanding and speaking are sufficient to make students effective, even if they aren't producing the language perfectly. Conversely, you won't be satisfied with error free language from them unless you see that they are also communicating effectively in a situation like one that they will meet outside of class.

As you bring your students to the point where they know that they are able to handle everyday contacts with some comfort, you will be contributing toward the primary goal of FAST courses, that of building confidence. Even the most relevant facts and skills are useless until someone is willing to put them to use. Normally, students are not willing to do so unless they are fairly confident that they will succeed. FAST courses build student confidence in two ways. First, they
brief students rather fully on how certain things should be done in the host country--this is informational. Second, they give students repeated experiences of success in real or simulated examples of doing those things--this is participatory. Confidence, in turn, leads to more frequent and more successful communication outside the classroom--and hence to fuller acquisition of language and culture.

French is a Romance language, belonging to the Indo-European family. It descended from the spoken Latin language of the Roman Empire, as did languages such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Catalan and others. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'o?llanguages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone.French is an official language in 29 countries, most of which form la francophonie (in French), the community of French-speaking countries. It is an official language of all United Nations agencies and a large number of international organizations. According to the European Union, 129 million, or twenty-six percent of the Union's total population, can speak French, of whom 72 million are native speakers (65 million in France, 4.5 million in Belgium and an additional 2.5 million in Switzerland, which is not part of the EU) and 69 million are second-language or foreign language speakers, thus making French the third language in the European Union that people state they are most able to speak, after English and German. Twenty percent of non-Francophone Europeans know how to speak French, totaling roughly 145.6 million people in Europe alone. As a result of extensive colonial ambitions of France and Belgium (at that time governed by a French-speaking elite), between the 17th and 20th centuries, French was introduced to colonies in the Americas, Africa, Polynesia, the Levant, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean.?French is an official language in 29 countries, most of which form la francophonie (in French), the community of French-speaking countries. It is an official language of all United Nations agencies and a large number of international organizations. According to the European Union, 129 million, or twenty-six percent of the Union's total population, can speak French, of whom 72 million are native speakers (65 million in France, 4.5 million in Belgium and an additional 2.5 million in Switzerland, which is not part of the EU) and 69 million are second-language or foreign language speakers, thus making French the third language in the European Union that people state they are most able to speak, after English and German. Twenty percent of non-Francophone Europeans know how to speak French, totaling roughly 145.6 million people in Europe alone. As a result of extensive colonial ambitions of France and Belgium (at that time governed by a French-speaking elite), between the 17th and 20th centuries, French was introduced to colonies in the Americas, Africa, Polynesia, the Levant, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean.?French is an official language in 29 countries, most of which form la francophonie (in French), the community of French-speaking countries. It is an official language of all United Nations agencies and a large number of international organizations. According to the European Union, 129 million, or twenty-six percent of the Union's total population, can speak French, of whom 72 million are native speakers (65 million in France, 4.5 million in Belgium and an additional 2.5 million in Switzerland, which is not part of the EU) and 69 million are second-language or foreign language speakers, thus making French the third language in the European Union that people state they are most able to speak, after English and German. Twenty percent of non-Francophone Europeans know how to speak French[clarification needed], totaling roughly 145.6 million people in Europe alone. As a result of extensive colonial ambitions of France and Belgium (at that time governed by a French-speaking elite), between the 17th and 20th centuries, French was introduced to colonies in the Americas, Africa, Polynesia, the Levant, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean.?

French is spoken in: France, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Madagascar, Canada, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, Bukina Faso, Niger, Senegal, Mali, Rwanda, Belgium, Guinea, Chad, Haiti, Burundi, Benin, Togo, Central African Republic, Gabon, Comoros, Djibouti, Luxembourg, Vanuatu, Se

French is also called: Fran?ais

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