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Audios

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 1-1

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 1-2

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 10-1

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 10-2

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 2-1

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 2-2

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 3-1

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 3-2

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 4-1

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 4-2

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 5-1

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 5-2

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 6-1

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 6-2

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 7-1

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 7-2

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 8-1

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 8-2

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 9-1

FSI-French Phonology-Chapter 9-2


Foreign Service Institute French  - Image Using this FSI French Phonology course, if you are willing to put in many hours of hard work reading, listening to, and imitating French sounds, words, and utterances, you can succeed in attaining a high degree of competence in French pronunciation and a basic knowledge of how French sounds correspond to the writing system.

The material that you are about to work with is divided into ten chapters. Each chapter has three parts.

Part One: Presentation of a short dialogue for memorization.

Part Two: Manipulation, correction, and reinforcement of the sounds presented in the dialogues involving a change of context, individual study, reading preparation and reading exercises.

Part Three: Tests.

Part One usually consists of 140 to 150 frames dealing with the pronunciation of sounds contained in the dialogue. Each frame contains a task that you must accomplish before you are ready to move ahead to the next one. You can learn Part One in about one hour in the language laboratory. That hour allows you to go over part one twice before entering the classroom for a check out session. Part Two will require another hour of laboratory work before you are ready to practice the language with your instructor. Part Three, Tests, are administered both in the laboratory and in the classroom

French is a Romance language, belonging to the Indo-European family. It descended from the spoken Latin language of the Roman Empire, as did languages such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Romanian, Catalan and others. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'o?llanguages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone.French is an official language in 29 countries, most of which form la francophonie (in French), the community of French-speaking countries. It is an official language of all United Nations agencies and a large number of international organizations. According to the European Union, 129 million, or twenty-six percent of the Union's total population, can speak French, of whom 72 million are native speakers (65 million in France, 4.5 million in Belgium and an additional 2.5 million in Switzerland, which is not part of the EU) and 69 million are second-language or foreign language speakers, thus making French the third language in the European Union that people state they are most able to speak, after English and German. Twenty percent of non-Francophone Europeans know how to speak French, totaling roughly 145.6 million people in Europe alone. As a result of extensive colonial ambitions of France and Belgium (at that time governed by a French-speaking elite), between the 17th and 20th centuries, French was introduced to colonies in the Americas, Africa, Polynesia, the Levant, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean.?French is an official language in 29 countries, most of which form la francophonie (in French), the community of French-speaking countries. It is an official language of all United Nations agencies and a large number of international organizations. According to the European Union, 129 million, or twenty-six percent of the Union's total population, can speak French, of whom 72 million are native speakers (65 million in France, 4.5 million in Belgium and an additional 2.5 million in Switzerland, which is not part of the EU) and 69 million are second-language or foreign language speakers, thus making French the third language in the European Union that people state they are most able to speak, after English and German. Twenty percent of non-Francophone Europeans know how to speak French, totaling roughly 145.6 million people in Europe alone. As a result of extensive colonial ambitions of France and Belgium (at that time governed by a French-speaking elite), between the 17th and 20th centuries, French was introduced to colonies in the Americas, Africa, Polynesia, the Levant, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean.?French is an official language in 29 countries, most of which form la francophonie (in French), the community of French-speaking countries. It is an official language of all United Nations agencies and a large number of international organizations. According to the European Union, 129 million, or twenty-six percent of the Union's total population, can speak French, of whom 72 million are native speakers (65 million in France, 4.5 million in Belgium and an additional 2.5 million in Switzerland, which is not part of the EU) and 69 million are second-language or foreign language speakers, thus making French the third language in the European Union that people state they are most able to speak, after English and German. Twenty percent of non-Francophone Europeans know how to speak French[clarification needed], totaling roughly 145.6 million people in Europe alone. As a result of extensive colonial ambitions of France and Belgium (at that time governed by a French-speaking elite), between the 17th and 20th centuries, French was introduced to colonies in the Americas, Africa, Polynesia, the Levant, Southeast Asia, and the Caribbean.?

French is spoken in: France, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Madagascar, Canada, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, Bukina Faso, Niger, Senegal, Mali, Rwanda, Belgium, Guinea, Chad, Haiti, Burundi, Benin, Togo, Central African Republic, Gabon, Comoros, Djibouti, Luxembourg, Vanuatu, Se

French is also called: Fran?ais

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