FSI - German - Basic Course - Volume 2

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Audios

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 13 13.1

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 13 13.2

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 13 13.3

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 14 14.1

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 14 14.2

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 14 14.3

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 15 15.1

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 15 15.2

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 15 15.3

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 15 15.4

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 15 15.5

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 16 16.1

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 16 16.2

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 16 16.3

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 16 16.4

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 17 17.1

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 17 17.2

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 17 17.3

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 17 17.4

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 17 17.5

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 18 18.1

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 18 18.2

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 18 18.3

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 18 18.4

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 19 19.1

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 19 19.2

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 19 19.3

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 19 19.4

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 20 20.1

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 20 20.2

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 20 20.3

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 21 21.1

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 21 21.2

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 21 21.3

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 21 21.4

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 22 22.1

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 22 22.2

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 22 22.3

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 23 23.1

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 23 23.2

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 23 23.3

German Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 24 24.1


Foreign Service Institute German  - Image It is the aim of the FSI German Basic course - of which this is Volume 2 of 2 - to provide the student with a useful control of the structure of the spoken language and of a basic vocabulary which meets at least some of the specialized needs of the Foreign Service.

After completion of the basic course the Foreign Service Officer should be able to make limited practical use of the language in his official duties and social obligations. They will furthermore have the means, given the proper surroundings and personal motivation, for continued rapid and efficient development of proficiency.

Methods and Procedures

This is a course in Spoken German; the forms and patterns of the language are intentionally colloquial. The emphasis in instruction is everywhere on speech, and an indispensable component of the learning process is the voice of a tutor, or instructor, whose native language is German. On no account should the student attempt to use these materials without either a native instructor or recordings of a native instructor's voice. The method of instruction incorporates guided imitation, repetition, memorization, pattern Practice, and
conversation

Working under the supervision of a linguist the tutor's role is to serve as a model for speech and to guide the student to accurate imitation by constant repetition and correction. The student's job is to watch and listen to the tutor carefully and to imitate as exactly as he can the sounds which he hears. He must be prepared for constant correction and repetition. Each time however the instructor will give him a model to follow by repeating the item first. The student should never attempt to read from his text but should always wait until he hears the word or utterance as the tutor speaks it for him. As far as possible he should leave his book closed during the presentation of new dialog material and keep his eyes on the tutor. Students will be asked to repeat in chorus and individually and will be expected to re-peat many, many times, even when their imitation has been good and accurate. Only by constant repetition after an authentic model for speech can habitual fluent and accurate reproduction of the sounds and forms of the foreign language be achieved. The basic sentences are preceded by "build-ups" giving the component parts of the utterance separately. Each new item which is introduced appears first as a build-up. The tutor will ask the students to repeat the build-ups separately first, then combined into larger units and finally the complete new sentence or utterance. The basic sentences are sub-divided into numbered sections, each to be treated as a unit, repeated in chorus and individually, with and with-out build-ups, until the students' imitation is satisfactory. Then a new section may be begun.

The time required to cover each section in thin way will differ widely depending on the size and ability of the class. After acceptable imitation and accurate pronunciation has been achieved in one or more sections they are assigned for memorization outside of class or repeated In class until memorized. The student should be able to give either the German sentence or its English equivalent on request or switch from one to the other and back again. The tutor will drill by repeating each sentence for each student in the class, then by giving each student a different sentence, repeating it for him first, and finally asking the students to recite the sentences in order, the first student the first sentence, the second student the second sentence, etc., without receiving a cue from the instructor. Repetition outside of class, preferably using recorded materials as a guide, should be continued to the point of verifying.

The student should not only be able to give the correct German sentence immediately upon hearing an English equivalent, at random selection, he should also be able to give the correct German sentence with equal ease and speed of response upon hearing its German cue. An a final step the students are expected to act out the basic dialog in entirety from memory, with the tutor or with other students. Only when the basic sentences have been mastered to this extent can they be considered to provide an adequate basis for control of the spoken language. It should be noted at this point that the English text accompanying the basic sentences is not primarily a translation but rather a set of conversational equivalents. Many apparent discrepancies will be found if the student,

You can find the next previous of the FSI German Basic Course here: FSI - German Basic Course - Volume 1

German is a West Germanic language. It derives most of its vocabulary from the Germanic branch of the Indo-European language family. A number of words are derived from Latin and Greek, and fewer from French and English. Widely spoken languages which are most similar to German include Luxembourgish, Dutch, the Frisian languages, English and the Scandinavian languages.

German is spoken in: Germany

German is also called: Alemanic, Alemannic, Alemannisch, Alsacien, Alsatian, Elsaessisch, German

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