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The FSI - German Headstart material can be used both as a self-guided course or with the assistance of a qualified German tutor.

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Audios

German Headstart - Tape 01 Side 1

German Headstart - Tape 01 Side 2

German Headstart - Tape 02

German Headstart - Tape 03 Side 1

German Headstart - Tape 03 Side 2

German Headstart - Tape 04 Side 1

German Headstart - Tape 04 Side 2

German Headstart - Tape 05 Side 1

German Headstart - Tape 05 Side 2

German Headstart - Tape 06 Side 1

German Headstart - Tape 06 Side 2

German Headstart - Tape 07

German Headstart - Tape 08 Side 1

German Headstart - Tape 08 Side 2

German Headstart - Tape 09 Side 1

German Headstart - Tape 09 Side 2

German Headstart - Tape 10 Side 1

German Headstart - Tape 10 Side 2

German Headstart - Tape 11

German Headstart - Tape 12 Side 1

German Headstart - Tape 12 Side 2

German Headstart - Tape 13 Side 1

German Headstart - Tape 13 Side 2

German Headstart - Tape 14 Side 1

German Headstart - Tape 14 Side 2


Foreign Service Institute German  - Image The FSI German Headstart Program will provide an orientation in the German language and culture in hopes of making your assignment in Germany an enjoyable one. When you finish this program, you will be able to communicate with Germans in several basic situations. For example, you will be able to ask for directions, change money, buy a ticket, order a meal, take a cab, get a hotel room, do some shopping, make phone calls, and engage in simple conversations. In such situations, Germans will understand you; and, if you ask them to speak slowly, you will understand what they say to you. There is quite a bit of work ahead of you, but the following hints on how to study the course material should prove helpful.

This is a do-it-yourself course. The work is done by you, interacting with various German speakers whose voices are re-corded on tape. If an instructor is not available, you can still reach the objectives by following the instructions which guide you through a great number of activities and exercises. The course material is designed to be used at your own pace. Meeting the objectives is the only thing that counts. It does not matter how long it takes you to do so.

LEARNING MATERIALS

The course consists of nine modules with accompanying tapes, an optional module designed principally for women in the Armed Forces and female dependents, the cultural notes, and this study guide.* You cannot take this course without using the tapes that go with the modules. Almost all exercises are to be done with the tapes. Explanations which are given on tape in English usually refer to German examples printed in the texts. Module X and the cultural notes are the only ones that are not accompanied by tape.

Unless you already have some knowledge of German, you should study the modules in numerical sequence. Do not go on to the next module if you have not mastered the previous one.

CONTENT OF MODULES

The modules deal with the following topics:

Module I: German sounds (and spelling) explained on the basis of geographic and personal names. Asking for directions.
Module II:Directions, numbers, greetings, courtesy expressions.
Module III: Ordering a meal in a restaurant.
Module IV: Changing money, buying a train ticket, telling time.
Module V: Taking a taxi, getting a hotel room, time expressions, dates. Module VI: Going shopping.
Module VII: Postal services: telephone, telegram, mail.
Module VIII: Visiting a German family at home.
Module IX: Meeting the German military.
Module X: At the cleaner's, drugstore, and hairdresser's.

German is a West Germanic language. It derives most of its vocabulary from the Germanic branch of the Indo-European language family. A number of words are derived from Latin and Greek, and fewer from French and English. Widely spoken languages which are most similar to German include Luxembourgish, Dutch, the Frisian languages, English and the Scandinavian languages.

German is spoken in: Germany

German is also called: Alemanic, Alemannic, Alemannisch, Alsacien, Alsatian, Elsaessisch, German

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