FSI - Kituba Basic Course

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Audios

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Foreign Service Institute Kituba  - Image This FSI Kituba Basic course represents the Kituba of which includes areas ACD plus MO and PR. The Congolese author of the course speaks also a dialect of Kikongo in some home contexts, Lingala in many contacts outside the home and French in most formal or academic contexts as well as with other Africans with whom he shares no common african language. He thus borrows rather freely from (L) and (F) and rather less freely from (K). The writers have compared his speech with that of a few representative speakers on audios from Radio Leopoldville and Radio Brazzaville and find that the language here represented does not differ in any major respect from the language of those audios, perhaps most closely paralleling the Brazzaville ones.2

This course consists of a 'primer' in the language and a five subject-oriented group of lessons. The primer. Is intended to introduce the major grammatical structures of the language, to develop in the student an adequate pronunciation, and to present a certain amount of useful vocabulary for a variety of situations. The primer is prerequisite to the rest of the course, and the student is expected to go through it in order, as each unit presupposes the vocabulary and the grammar of the earlier ones.

The subject-oriented lesson groups all presuppose the vocabulary and grammar of the entire primer, and each group is intended to be studied from the beginning - the vocabulary within a given group begin cumulative. However, no subject-oriented lesson group depends in any way on any other group so that the student is free to pursue his study of these lesson groups in any order after he has finished the primer.

Kituba is known by many names among its speakers. In the Republic of Congo it is called Munukutuba or Kituba. The former is a grammatically incorrect phrase which means literally "I to speak". The latter means simply "speech". The name Kituba is used in the constitution of the Republic of Congo. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo it is called Kikongo ya leta (i.e. Kikongo of the state administration), but it is often called in short Kikongo, especially out of the region of ethnic Bakongo people. The constitution of the Democratic Republic of Congo lists Kikongo as one of the national languages. In fact, it refers to Kikongo ya leta (i.e. Kituba), because a translation of the constitution itself is written in Kituba but no translation exists in Kikongo! There are also other historical names such as Kibulamatadi, Kikwango, Ikeleve, and Kizabave but they have largely fallen out of use. In the academic circles the language is called Kikongo-Kituba.

Kituba is spoken in: Republic of Congo

Kituba has no known alternate names.

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