FSI - Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2

We made using the FSI - Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 material easier to use and more effective. You can now read the ebook (in the pane on the left), listen to the audio (pane to the right) and practice your pronunciation (use on the Pronunciation Tool tab on right) all at the same time.

The FSI - Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 material can be used both as a self-guided course or with the assistance of a qualified Spanish tutor.

NOTE: Some of these ebooks are quite large and may take a minute to fully load.

Back To Online Spanish Courses

NOTE: To read the file, listen to the audios and use the pronunciation tab on your computer or device you need to have a PDF reader and a modern browser.

Audios

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 16A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 16B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 17A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 17B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 18A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 18B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 19A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 19B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 20A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 20B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 21A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 21B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 21C

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 22A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 22B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 23A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 23B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 23C

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 24A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 24B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 24C

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 25A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 25B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 26A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 26B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 27A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 27B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 27C

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 28A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 28B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 28C

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 29A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 29B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 30A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 30B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 30C


Foreign Service Institute Spanish  - Image The materials in this FSI Spanish Basics course volume 2 (of 4) have been developed to present Spanish as a spoken language, and the skills of understanding and speaking are accordingly emphasized.

The first two units are focused primarily on pronunciation problems. Drills on other aspects of the language are deliberately postponed because of the importance of developing good pronunciation habits from the very beginning of the course. Pronunciation is extremely important. It is the basis of all real fluency. A person is readily able to understand anything he can meaningfully say himself, if the correlation between the way he hears it and the way he says it is reasonably similar. Probably the more similar, the greater the ease of comprehension.

The basis of the student's imitation is of course the teacher, whose pronunciation, if he is a native speaker of an acceptable dialect of his own country, is the ultimate source of authority. The fundamental classroom procedure for learning new material throughout this book (except the reading materials) is repetition by the student in direct immediate imitation after the teacher. The imitative repetition may at first be done in chorus after the teacher, and subsequently by each individual, or it may be individualized from the start. In either case the student should wait for the teacher's model. Imitating after another student too frequently results in compounding the errors of both. If a person is fortunate enough to begin studying a second language before the age of eight or ten, the powers of imitation are normally sufficient to insure excellent results in pronunciation without resorting to technical explanations of what happens to various parts of the vocal apparatus. If occasionally an individual has managed to retain this gift that all of us had in childhood, so much the better, but most adults need more specific guidance based on an awareness of the particular problems of producing particular sounds. The drills and explanations in the first two units are devoted to the specific problems an English speaker with his English habits of pronunciation will have in accurately imitating the sounds and sequences of sounds of Spanish.

If speakers of English were not so highly literate, it might be possible to teach effectively without reference to any written symbolization, but most students are much more comfortable if some kind of representation of what they are imitating is also available for visual reference. There is, of course, a traditional writing system for Spanish which is used in all parts of the Spanish speaking world. It is a very adequate system for its purpose, which might be stated as providing visual cues for persons who already speak the language. For pedagogical purposes, a respelling, or phonetic representation of Spanish is also provided as a means of re-minding the student of important features of the pronunciation which the traditional spelling system does not provide, such as significant sound distinctions, word groupings, intonation patterns, etc.

The phonetic symbolization may at first look unfamiliar and somewhat foreboding, but this very unfamiliarity is a healthy re-minder that none of the English sounds (which are so easily associated with the familiar letters of the alpha-bet) are exact duplication of the Spanish sounds to be mastered. This is also, of course, true in the re-spelling when familiar symbols are used: the appearance of the letter t does not mean the familiar English t-sound is indicated.

The intonations are marked in the respelling by a system of dots and accents placed at relative heights over the vowels. The patterns recorded in this way are not necessarily the only possibilities in spoken Spanish, but they are all normal patterns which have been thoroughly and widely tested.

The symbolization in the respelling will allow for a consistent interpretation of the pronunciation of any dialect area of the Spanish speaking world. For example, the '%' symbol is to be interpreted as a sound similar to the 's' of 'sink' in Spanish America, but as the 'th' of 'think' in Central Spain. other regional pronunciation features are similarly marked.

The acquisition of a good pronunciation is first of all the result of careful listening and imitation plus whatever help can be obtained from initial pronunciation drills and description, and from the cues provided for continuing reference by the aids to listening. It is well to remember that a sizeable investment in pronunciation practice early in the course will pay handsome dividends later; correct pronunciation safely relegated to habit leaves one's full attention available for other problems of learning the language.

Other Volumes of Spanish Basic Course:

You can find the other volumes of the course at the Live Lingua Project here:
- FSI Spanish Basics Course - Volume 1
- FSI Spanish Basics Course - Volume 3
- FSI Spanish Basics Course - Volume 4

Spanish also called Castilian (castellano), is a Romance language that originated in Castile, a region in Spain. There are approximately 407 million people speaking Spanish as a native language, making it the second-most-spoken language by number of native speakers after Mandarin. It also has 60 million speakers as a second language, and 20 million students as a foreign language. Spanish is one of the six official languages of the United Nations, and is used as an official language by the European Union and Mercosur. Spanish is the most popular second language learned by native speakers of American English. From the last decades of the 20th century, the study of Spanish as a foreign language has grown significantly, facilitated in part because of the growing population demographics and economies of many Spanish-speaking countries, growing international tourism and the search for less expensive retirement destinations by North Americans and Europeans.

Spanish is spoken in: Spain, Mexico, Columbia, Argentina, Peru, Venezuela, Chile, Ecuador, Guatemala, Cuba, Bolivia, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Paraguay, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, Panama, Uruguay, Equatorial Guinea

Spanish is also called: Castellano, Castilian, Castillan, Español

Back To Online Spanish Courses