FSI - Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3

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Audios

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 31A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 31B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 32A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 32B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 33A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 33B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 34A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 34B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 35A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 35B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 36A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 36B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 37A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 37B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 38A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 38B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 39A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 39B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 40A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 40B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 41A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 41B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 42A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 42B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 43A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 43B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 44A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 44B

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 44C

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 45A

Spanish Basic Course - Volume 3 - Unit 45B


Foreign Service Institute Spanish  - Image The materials in this FSI Spanish Basics course volume 3 (of 4) have been developed to present Spanish as a spoken language, and the skills of understanding and speaking are accordingly emphasized.

The basic dialogs are the core of each unit. These dialogs are recreations of the real situations a student is most likely to encounter, and the vocabulary and sentences are those he is most likely to need. The dialogs are set in a mythical country called Surlandia, which is described as a typical Latin American republic, insofar as it is possible to extract common features from so diverse an area. To further provide information in context, many of the notes suggest regional differences in both the language and the culture that will be encountered in various areas of Latin America and in Spain.

In the first part of the book new vocabulary is introduced mainly in the basic dialogs. Occasionally, in the illustrations of grammar points, new words are introduced in order to fill out patterns needed to do the exercises. New words are always clearly indicated by placing them on a line themselves, indented between the lines that are complete sentences. Since each new word is introduced in this fashion only once, the student should take pains to be sure he learns each word as it is presented. Careful pains have been taken to see that each word introduced will reappear many times later in the course, to help the student assimilate each word in a variety of contexts.

Each sections is made clear and readable, it has to be recognized that a description of a language is a technical subject, and simplification can only be attained by sacrificing accuracy or at a cost of a great many more words than space allows. The student who works through these discussions by a careful reading will find that he is acquiring a set of analytical tools that will be useful throughout the remainder of his career of interest in language.

The student may notice slight differences in the respelling used in the aids to listening and in the gram-mar charts and discussions. The respelling useful as a guide to pronunciation for an English speaking student, records more details than a respelling to be used in grammar discussions where comparisons are made between Spanish forms, not between English and Spanish pronunciation.

The conversation section of each unit is designed to help bridge the gap between the more or less mechanical stimulus-response activity of the drills and the skill of free conversation which is the ultimate aim of the course. These recombination monologues and dialogs extend the abilities of the student into ever more natural situations. The narrative is an anecdote type description of an event or situation which listen then recast as a directed dialog in which the teacher acts as a prompter for students who take the parts as the actors. The prompter gradually withdraws his help so that in the end the conversation is carried on freely.

Beginning with unit 16 reading materials are introduced for outside preparation with perhaps some classroom discussion of the questions provided. These readings can also be used to provide content information for oral summaries.

Up through unit 30 the readings tell a continued story about an American family living in Surlandial ex-panding on matters of interest hinted at in the basic dialogs. These require no new vocabularly except for easy and obvious cognate loan words that can readily be guessed. From unit 31 through 60 the readings are much longer and do introduce a considerable number of new words. This vocabulary is introduced through basic sentences which summarize the content of the following reading.

The readings are designed to provide information of interest and value about the culture which the Spanish language reflects and to provide insight into the practical problems an American is likely to encounter in ad-justing to life in a Hispanic area.
The student should learn the basic dialogs by heart. If they are committed perfectly to rote memory, the drills will go easily and rapidly. Roughly half of the estimated ten hours that are spent in class on each unit should normally be devoted to the basic dialogs.

Each unit can in some ways be likened to a musical theme with variations. The basic dialogs are the theme, and the drills provide the variations. Patterns of the structure of the language which have been learned in the basic sentences are expanded and manipulated in the drills.
There are four kinds of drills in each unit (three before Unit 6). Of these, two are designed to system-atically vary selected basic sentences within the structure and vocabulary the student has already learned. And two are oriented toward the structure of the language to provide a systematic coverage of all important patterns.

All of these drills are planned to be easily and rapidly answered. They can be done orally and with only the teacher's book open. The method of conducting the drill is clearly shown by the format of the text, and all answers are available for the teacher's convenience and for the student to refer to when studying outside of class. If a drill is found to be hard, the difficulty probably reflects inadequacy in the mastery of the dia-logs and earlier drills. The drills are not problems to be worked out like mathematics, and the ability to do them, not to figure them, is indicated by the nature of the course. There are no tricks in them, and they are not intended as tests.

Pattern drills are presented in a format which provides both practice and explanation. First appears a presentation of the pattern to be drilled, then various kinds of drills, and finally a more detailed discussion of the pattern.
The presentation consists of a listing of basic sentences (and a few new sentences when necessary) which illustrate the grammar point to be drilled. Then there is an extrapolation which shows the relationships in-volved in the pattern in a two-dimensional chart, which is further explained by a short note or two. This pre-sentation should provide sufficient clues to enable the student to understand and use the pattern correctly in the drills that follow.
These drills are mainly exercises making substitutions, responses, and translations, highlighting the grammar points covered. They are devised for oral answers to oral stimuli.

After the drills there is a more detailed discussion of the pattern drilled. These descriptions are written in a condensed and somewhat technical fashion. While an effort was made to keep these discussions


Other Volumes of Spanish Basic Course:

You can find the other volumes of the course at the Live Lingua Project here:
- FSI Spanish Basics Course - Volume 1
- FSI Spanish Basics Course - Volume 2
- FSI Spanish Basics Course - Volume 4

Spanish also called Castilian (castellano), is a Romance language that originated in Castile, a region in Spain. There are approximately 407 million people speaking Spanish as a native language, making it the second-most-spoken language by number of native speakers after Mandarin. It also has 60 million speakers as a second language, and 20 million students as a foreign language. Spanish is one of the six official languages of the United Nations, and is used as an official language by the European Union and Mercosur. Spanish is the most popular second language learned by native speakers of American English. From the last decades of the 20th century, the study of Spanish as a foreign language has grown significantly, facilitated in part because of the growing population demographics and economies of many Spanish-speaking countries, growing international tourism and the search for less expensive retirement destinations by North Americans and Europeans.

Spanish is spoken in: Spain, Mexico, Columbia, Argentina, Peru, Venezuela, Chile, Ecuador, Guatemala, Cuba, Bolivia, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Paraguay, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, Panama, Uruguay, Equatorial Guinea

Spanish is also called: Castellano, Castilian, Castillan, Español

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