FSI - Turkish Basic Course (Volume 2)

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Audios

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 31

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 32

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 33

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 34

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 35

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 36

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 37

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 38

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 39

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 40

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 41

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 42

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 43

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 44

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 45 Tape 1

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 45 Tape 2

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 46 Tape 1

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 46 Tape 2

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 47 Tape 1

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 47 Tape 2

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 48 Tape 1

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 48 Tape 2

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 49 Tape 1

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 49 Tape 2

Turkish Basic Course - Volume 2 - Unit 50


Foreign Service Institute Turkish  - Image You are about to start the study of the Turkish language. Whatever your motivation for doing so, you will get greater enjoyment and satisfaction from your study if you will cooperate fully with the instructional system embodied in this course. This introduction is intended to acquaint you with the book and with the method advocated for its utilization. The Introduction for the Teacher which follows contains more detailed instructions for the use of this text. You may find it worthwhile to read that also.

Turkish is the principal language of the Republic of Turkey. It is a member, along with the related languages of Iranian and Soviet Azerbaijan and of various areas within the Soviet Union, mainly in Asia, of the Turkic group of the Altaic branch of the Uralic-Altaic language family. This Altaic branch also includes many other languages, mainly those grouped under the headings 'Mongol' and 'Manchu'.
The Turkic languages are remarkably similar in structure and even in vocabulary, at least as closely related to one another as, say, the Romance group of Indo-European languages.

The population of the Republic of Turkey is about 30,000,000, of whom the great majority are native speakers of Turkish, making Turkish by a considerable margin the largest language of the Turkic family. Among the remainder of the population of Turkey-native speakers of Kurdish, Laz, Circassian, Arabic, Greek, Armenian, Syriac and other languages-the great majority, at least of the men, have some acquaintance with Turkish. Thus this language will serve the student for communication in all parts of Turkey save the most isolated Kurdish village. In addition, substantial numbers of Turkish speakers are to be found in parts of Syria, Lebanon, Greece and Cyprus. Turkish can serve the student also as an introduction to the Turkic language family and provide him with a basis for establishing communication with Asian Turkic speakers as far east as Sinkiang Province in China and as far west as the Tatar regions on the Volga.

Turkish also referred to as Istanbul Turkish or Anatolian Turkish, is the most widely-spoken of the Turkic languages, with over 63 million native speakers. Speakers are located predominantly in Turkey, with smaller groups in Germany, Bulgaria, Macedonia, Northern Cyprus, Greece, and other parts of Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia. The roots of the language can be traced to Central Asia, with the first known written records dating back nearly 1,300 years. To the west, the influence of Ottoman Turkishthe variety of the Turkish language that was used as the administrative and literary language of the Ottoman Empirespread as the Ottoman Empire expanded. In 1928, as one of Atat?rk's Reforms in the early years of the Republic of Turkey, the Ottoman script was replaced with a Latin alphabet. Concurrently, the newly founded Turkish Language Association initiated a drive to reform and standardize the language.

Turkish is spoken in: Turkey

Turkish is also called: Anatolian, Osmanli, Türkçe, Türkisch, Turki

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