Peace Corps - Marshallese Language Lessons

We made using the Peace Corps - Marshallese Language Lessons material easier to use and more effective. You can now read the ebook (in the pane on the left), listen to the audio (pane to the right) and practice your pronunciation (use on the Pronunciation Tool tab on right) all at the same time.

The Peace Corps - Marshallese Language Lessons material can be used both as a self-guided course or with the assistance of a qualified Marshallese tutor.

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Audios



Currently there are no audios available for this course.

If you have the missing audios for this course please contact support@livelingua.com so we can make them available to everybody.


US Peace Corps Marshallese  - Image COURSE OVERVIEW
This Peace Corps Marshallese language course is designed to teach you the basic survival level of Marshallese you would need. There are 8 sections that cover the following subjects:

SECTION ONE : Majuro
SECTION TWO : The training site
SECTION THREE : Classroom language
SECTION FOUR : Travel
SECTION FIVE : Grammar
SECTION SIX : Texts
SECTION SEVEN : Songs
SECTION EIGHT : Translations

PROGRAMS THAT USED THIS LANGUAGE
Marshall Islands: 1966-1996; Currently Inactive

PROGRAM SECTORS
Marshall Islands: Currently Inactive

The Marshallese language (Marshallese: new orthography Kajin Maje or old orthography Kajin Majl, [k?zin(e) mz]), also known as Ebon, is a Malayo-Polynesian language spoken in the Marshall Islands by about 44,000 people, and the principal language of the country. There are two major dialects: Rlik (western) and Ratak (eastern). Marshallese, a Micronesian language, is a member of the Eastern Oceanic subgroup of the Austronesian languages. The closest linguistic relatives of Marshallese are the other Micronesian languages, including Chuukese, Gilbertese, Kosraean, Nauruan and Pohnpeian. Marshallese shows 33% lexican similarity with Pohnpeian. Within the Micronesian archipelago, Marshallese along with the rest of the Micronesian language group are not as closely related to the more ambiguously-classified Oceanic language Yapese in Yap State, or to the Polynesian outlier languages Kapingamarangi and Nukuoro in Pohnpei State, and are even less closely related to the SundaSulawesi languages of Palauan in Palau and Chamorro in the Mariana Islands.?

Marshallese is spoken in: Marshall Islands

Marshallese is also called: Ebon

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